how terrible to die each night on the blade of our horizon // r.i.d

how terrible to die each night on the blade of our horizon // r.i.d

(via ioshid)

There’s the television. It’s all right there - all right there. Look, listen, kneel, pray. Commercials! We’re not productive anymore. We don’t make things anymore. It’s all automated. What are we *for* then? We’re consumers, Jim. Yeah. Okay, okay. Buy a lot of stuff, you’re a good citizen. But if you don’t buy a lot of stuff, if you don’t, what are you then, I ask you? What? Mentally *ill*. Fact, Jim, fact - if you don’t buy things - toilet paper, new cars, computerized yo-yos, electrically-operated sexual devices, stereo systems with brain-implanted headphones, screwdrivers with miniature built-in radar devices, voice-activated computers…

herzogbaby:

Just saw Chris Marker’s La Jetée (1962), the inspiration for Gilliam’s 12 Monkeys, and was blown away. It should be the antithesis to engaging cinematic storytelling as it is told almost exclusively through still images and voice over. Yet, each image is so immaculately put together and conveys such pure raw emotion that it is utterly engrossing. On top of that the story itself is wonderfully written, intriguing, and heartbreaking. This is a film all about the memories that can be encapsulated in an image and images that can haunt us for years, and so it is full of impactful and memorable images. There’s a chance this may have already surpassed 12 Monkeys for me as this is such a perfect little film. Although Marker avoids traditional cinematic storytelling methods this still manages to be a purely cinematic experience. Images, music, and (especially) editing, combined is what makes cinema unique and La Jetée exemplifies this in an excellent way.

somerepulsiveimp:

Aaliyah - One in a Million (dir. Paul Hunter), 1996

12 Monkeys - Interrogation Room Set, 1995

Lebbeus Woods, Neomechanical Tower (Upper) Chamber, 1987 (colour vers. published 1992)


…somewhere inside him, the memory of a twice-lived fragment of time…

…somewhere inside him, the memory of a twice-lived fragment of time…

awritersruminations:

"A human being can only endure depression up to a certain point; when this point of saturation is reached it becomes necessary for him to discover some element of pleasure, no matter how humble or on how low a level, in his environment if he is to go on living at all. In my case these insignificant birds with their subdued colorings have provided just sufficient distraction to keep me from total despair. Each day I find myself spending longer and longer at the window watching their flights, their quarrels, their mouse-quick flutterings, their miniature feuds and alliances. Curiously enough, it is only when I am standing in front of the window that I feel any sense of security. While I am watching the birds I believe that I am comparatively immune from the assaults of life. The very indifference to humanity of these wild creatures affords me a certain safeguard. Where all else is dangerous, hostile and liable to inflict pain, they alone can do no injury because, probably, they are not even aware of my existence. The birds are at once my refuge and my relaxation."

—Anna Kavan, from “The Birds”, in Asylum Piece and Other Stories

Image: La Jetée (1962), directed by Chris Marker

adustlandfairytale3:

He ran toward her. And when he recognized the man who’d trailed him from the camp, he realized there was no escape out of time, and that that moment he’d been granted to see as a child, and that had obsessed him forever after… was the moment of his own death.
La jetée - Chris Marker

adustlandfairytale3:

He ran toward her. And when he recognized the man who’d trailed him from the camp, he realized there was no escape out of time, and that that moment he’d been granted to see as a child, and that had obsessed him forever after… was the moment of his own death.

La jetée - Chris Marker